Milan Township Communities Cone and Azalia

milantownshiphall

Milan Township Hall.  Photo by Dwight Burdette

Milan Township is located in Monroe County, Michigan, sharing a northern boundary with the City of Milan. The Township of Milan and the City of Milan have been completely separate units since Milan became a city in 1967. Azalia and Cone are two historic unincorporated communities in Milan Township and both of their back stories illustrate the impact of individuals on history. [1]

Azalia – East Milan in a Past Life

 azalia methodist church

The Methodist Episcopal Church began classes in the early 1850s and by 1870, held classes and worship services in a church building.  Their church continues to the present as Azalia United Methodist Church. Azalia United Methodist Church, Dundee Azalia Road.  Photo by Dwight Burdette

First named East Milan or Reeves Station, Azalia is located approximately five miles south of Milan and four miles north of Dundee, between sections 24 and 25 of the Milan Township on the north branch of Macon Creek.

According to Talcott Wing in the History of Monroe County Michigan, Sayre Reeves and his son William operated the Star Bending Company in the community which became known as Reeves Station., and later East Milan.Sayre Reeves and his wife Betsey Youngs Reeves were both born in New York in 1807. They married in New York and the first of their ten children were born in New York. Some were born in Dexter, Michigan, and the youngest were born in Oakville, just east of Milan. Some of the Reeves children married Azalia citizens, so Sayre moved to the center of Azalia. . children married Azalia residents, so Sayre moved to Azalia.  He died in 1877.[2]    

Some historical accounts say that in 1869, on August 4, 1869 (others say that in 1866) a settler named Daniel T. Hazen worked to have the government open a post office at East Milan to avoid having to journey to West Milan, present day Cone, to get his mail. On August 4, 1869 (other accounts say in 1866) the government opened the post office in East Milan. Steven Frink served as the first postmaster of East Milan. Daniel T. Hazen became postmaster in 1867, Joseph Meadows in 1872, John M. Lewis in 1877, and A.C. Reynolds in 1884. [3]

In 1878, the Toledo Ann Arbor and Grand Trunk Railway began operations in Michigan and on September 1, 1887, the United States postmaster general ordered the name of the East Milan post office changed from East Milan to Azalia and reappointed Joseph Meadows as postmaster.[4]

schedule

Between 1880 and 1884, the railroad running through Azalia was called the Toledo, Ann Arbor and Grand Trunk Railway as this schedule reflects. It eventually became the Ann Arbor and Grand Trunk Railway and then the Ann Arbor Railway.[5]

Walter Romig, in his book, Michigan Place Names wrote that Stephen B. Frink became the first postmaster of East Milan on August 4, 1869.William C. Reeves and his son operated the Star Bending Company and the settlement was called Reeves Station.  The United States Postmaster General renamed Reeves Station Azalia to match the name of its railroad depot which had been named for the daughter of an executive of the railroad.[6]

Local historians have differing versions of how Azalia received its name. Some agree with the story that Azalia was named after the daughter of a conductor on the Toledo, Ann Arbor, and Grand Trunk Railway and others contend that Azalia was named after the daughter or wife of a railroad executive like owner James Ashley or his sons James Jr. Henry Winfield, and Charles Sumner Ashley who worked for the railroad. Other historians say that none of the railroad officials had a daughter or wife name Azalia.

The Michigan State Gazetteer of 1875 profiled East Milan as a village of 200 people in Milan Township, Monroe County, 18 miles northwest of Monroe, with the nearest railroad point located six miles south in Dundee on the Chicago & Canada Southern Railway. East Milan had a saw mill, two planing mills, and a bending factory which William C. Reeves and his father Sayre had founded. Lumber and live stock were the chief shipments. There was a weekly mail delivery and Joseph W. Meadows served as postmaster.

East Milan’s 1875 Business Directory[7]

T.J. Ball, saw mill[8]

A.W. Becker, general store

  1. Ingraham, cooper

C.H. McBride, wagon maker

Reeves & Hanson, saw and planing mill

S.L Shaw, cooper

Henry Smith, builder

Star Bending Company, general store, saw mill and bending works

James Turnbull, builder

Wendhousen, blacksmith

After September 1887, East Milan officially became Azalai after the azalai railroad station of the Toledo, Ann Arbor & Northern Michigan Railway. The 1887-1888 Michigan State Gazetteer listed East Milan or azalai as being settled in 1837 with a current population of 250 people. The village featured two churches, Methodist Episcopal and Free Methodist, Western Union, and a daily mail delivery, with A.C. Reynolds serving as postmaster. The nearest banks were located in Dundee and Milan, each about five miles away.

Samuel S. Winters operated a brick yard on his farm along the Macon Road on the north side of Day Road in Milan Township.  According to Reverend Ronald A. Brunger in his history, “A Century of Methodism,” that he wrote in 1956 for the Azalia Church’s 100-year celebration, part of the brick for building the Methodist Episcopal Church of East Milan came from the Samuel S. Winters farm.  Samuel is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Azalia Business Directory, 1887-1888

Lewis Andrews, carpenter

Joseph Emmette, carpenter

Alonzo C. Hitchcock, railroad express agent[9]

Moses J. Howe, notary and supervisor[10]

Mrs. Lewis Knittle, blacksmith [11]

George Leet, shoemaker[12]

Theodore Leet, barber[13]

Edwin M. Lewis, general store and brick manufacturer

Joseph W. Meadows, general store[14]

Benjamin F. Paine, justice of peace

Cassius M. Paine, carpenter

Miss Laura Paine, school principal

William C. Reeves, lumber and charcoal manufacturer[15]

A.C. Reynolds, constable

Dr. Randall Schuyler, druggist; He is buried in Forest Hill Cemetery in Ann Arbor.

Daniel Springer, charcoal[16]

James Turnbull, carpenter[17]

Some Azalia Pioneers

Edith Ruth Lytle Carter – Dedicated to her family and her country

Born in Ohio, Ruth moved to Michigan at a young age and she married Marcus Carter in Dundee, Michigan, on February 15, 1936.  They built a home on Baraga Street in Taylor, Michigan, and eventually had two daughters and a son.

In 1942 as the United States geared up as part of the Allied effort to defeat the Axis powers, Ruth vowed that she would do something for her country and that her children would have a good Christmas. Acting on these beliefs, she took a job at the Willow Run Bomber plant.  On the morning of December 17, 1942, she was a passenger in a car on the way to work at Willow Run when she was killed in a car accident on an icy road. Friends and family members said that a few days before her death Ruth had a premonition of her death and asked some of them to take care of her children if something happened to her.

Ruth left behind a grieving widower Marcus and three young children, 5, 3, and 2.  Her friends and family said that on the day of her funeral schools in Taylor, Michigan closed so that the faculty could go to her funeral.  She hadn’t worked at the school, but regularly took treats to the children and volunteered there when she had some free time.  She is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Prominent Farmers

Arthur Milburn Heath, 1880-1955, the son of Nathan and Mary Heath, owned and operated one of the largest farms in Milan Township. He was a member of the Azalia Grange and he is buried in Azalia Cemetery. The extended Heath family farmed in the Mila area for over decades.

Road Construction and Deputy Sheriff

John Michelsen

John Michelsen was born in Latchie, Ohio in 1877 and lived near Milan, Michigan since 1913.  He was superintendent of road construction in Monroe County and he served as a Monroe County Sheriff’s Deputy for 15 years. He died in June 1956 and he is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Supervisor and John Deere Dealer

Sayre W. Reeves

Sayre W. Reeves was born on September 17, 1878, in Milan Township to William C. and Elizabeth Masten Reeves. In November 1917, he married Mae Allen in Dundee and they had a daughter, Adlaine.

A Milan area resident all of his life, he was a John Deere implement dealer.  He also served as a Milan Township Supervisor for eighteen years, Milan Township treasurer for a time, Milan Township Clerk, and justice of the peace.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Teacher and Township Clerk

Myron L. Winters

Myron L. Winters was born on July 31, 1870, the oldest of the four children of Myron and Mary A. Winters.  He grew up on the family farm on Day Road in Milan Township. He graduated from Dundee Schools in 1890 and furthered his education, becoming a teacher. He taught school in the Milan, Dundee, and London Districts and he also served as principal in Ida, Newport, Temperance, Samaria and Waterloo schools.  He retired in 1939, after ten years at Waterloo.

He served as Milan Township clerk from 1944 to July 1953, retiring because of ill health. He was a lifelong member of the Azalia Methodist Church and after his death in January 1953, he was buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Some Veterans Resting in Azalia Methodist Episcopal Cemetery

azaliamethodistepiscoaplcemetery

Civil War

Nathan Austin.  Civil War. Co. I, 1st Michigan, E8M.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Albert A. Austin. Civil War.  6th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Nelson Delois Baird. Civil War. Company E, 1st Michigan Light Artillery. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

 William E. Blackburn. Civil War. Co. D. 15th Michigan Infantry. He died on March 14, 1863 while in the Army in Michigan.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

 Vernon DeAnon Foster. Civil War.  Co. K, 18th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

James S. Dowsett. Civil War. Co. B., 5th Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery. 

Myles Frink.

Civil War.  Dr. Albert A. Aiston. Battery B, Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Stephen B. Frink married Sally Maria Holcomb in 1842. Both had immigrated from New York to Michigan and after their marriage settled on a farm in Milan Township.  They had four children. Their son Myles enlisted in Company H, 18th Michigan Infantry on August 26, 1862 as a private and was promoted to corporal. He reenlisted in Company H of the 12th Michigan. Myles was captured at Athens, Georgia while charging the fort there and he was exchanged as a prisoner of war and was on his way home on the Steamboat Sultana on the Mississippi River when it exploded on April 27, 1865.  Myles was killed.

James H. Galloway.  Civil War. He enlisted in Co. I, 1st US sharp shooters and Co K, 5th MI info as well as Co B 14 VRC (veteran reserve corps).  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Horace Hayes.  Civil War.  Enlisted in Company I, 11th Michigan Infantry at age 42 in August 1861.  He received a disability discharge on July 11, 1862 at Detroit, Michigan.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Nelson Truman Hazen. Civil War.  Co, C, 4th Michigan Infantry. Nelson enlisted in Company G of the Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry on September 9, 1862. On detached service with Company G of the First Michigan Infantry, by order, July 2, 1864, Petersburg, Virginia. Discharged from service on June 5, 1865. Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War 1861 -1865, vol. 4.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

John Jones. Civil War. Co. C, 17th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Pvt. Nathaniel Jones. Civil War.  Co. F, 26th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

James P.Knowles. Civil War. Co. C, 17th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery

Michael Thomas Knowles. Civil War. Company C, 17th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Warren T. Lafler.  Civil War. 1821-1887.  Co. K, 15th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Warren B. Lafler, his son.  Civil War. 1845-1911.  Co. D., 7th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

William Lamson. Civil War.  Co. B, 5th New York.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Silas W. Leet. Civil War. Co. E, 1st Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Hiram Libbey.  Civil War.  Pvt. Co. G, 9th Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Oliver Libbey.  Civil War. 17th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

George M. Marshall.  Civil War.  Co. D., 7th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Paden Marshall.  Civil War. 6th Michigan Cavalry, Company C.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

George Richard Martin or George Gest. Civil War.  George was born in Wallaceburg, Ontario in 1846. He served in the U.S. Civil War, Company F, 22nd Michigan Infantry and in Company B, 29th Michigan Infantry. He died on November 13, 1919, in Wallaceburg, Ontario. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Abe Masten. Civil War.  Company C, 5th Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Lewis A. Mellinger. Civil War. Pvt. Co. A, 13th Reg., IN, Cal. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Moses Morgan. Civil War. Co. G. Fourth Michigan Infantry. He was wounded in action at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863, and he reenlisted as a Corporal on December 29, 1863. On detached service with Company G of the Fourth Michigan Infantry, by order, July 2, 1864, Petersburg, Virginia. Transferred to Company C of the Reorganized Fourth Michigan Infantry on July 5, 1865. Discharged on Surgeon’s certificate of disability on February 9, 1866, at Detroit, Michigan. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Emmet Reeves. Civil War. Company B, 1st Michigan Infantry. He drew a pension of $22.00 a month and he died on January 23, 1881 from his injuries he received during the war. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

William C. Reeves.  Civil War. Corporal. Company H, 18th Michigan Infantry. POW survived the War. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Daniel Ronecker. Civil War.  Co. C, 30th Illinois Infantry. He was the proprietor of a dry goods store in Azalia and he is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Aaron Sanders. Co. B, 189th Ohio Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Cornelius O. Smith. Civil War.  17th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Daniel Webster Smith.  Civil War. Co. E, 9th Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Denias Smith.  Civil War.  Corporal Co. D, 7th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Henry O. Smith. Civil War.  Company H, 18th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

David C. Spears. Civil War. Co. B, 104th New York Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Edmund L. Thompson. Civil War. Co. C, 17th Michigan Infantry.  Wounded at the Battle of Antietam and died from his wounds on March 28, 1863.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Daniel Warner. Civil War. Co. H, 18th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Edwin Webster. Civil War.  Company G, Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry. Edwin Webster enlisted in Company G of the Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry on September 19, 1861, at Hudson, Michigan, for 3 years. Wounded and missing in action at Gaines’ Mill, Virginia, on June 27, 1862. Re-enlisted December 29, 1863. On detached service with Company G of the First Michigan Infantry, by order, July 2, 1864, Petersburg, Virginia. Transferred to Company C of the Reorganized Fourth Michigan Infantry on July 1, 1865. Promoted to Corporal on November 1, 1865. Mustered out of service at San Antonio, Texas, February 26, 1866. Information from: Record of Service of Michigan Volunteers in the Civil War 1861 -1865, vol. 4″, also known as the “Brown Book”. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

William Webster. Civil War. Co. A, 17th Iowa Infantry.  His pension file states that he served with Company B, 17th Iowa Infantry and that Sarah Collins filed a pension request on April 5, 1890. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Jacob Wilcox.  Civil War.  Company E, First Michigan Cavalry. He was injured at the Battle of Cedar Creek in Virginia. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

William L. Woodward.  Civil War.  Co. H, 18th Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Spanish American War

George A. Palmer. Spanish American War. Cpl. Co.D., 35th Reg. Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Elzer L. Winters. Spanish American War. Co. G, 31 Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

World War I

Charles Dewey Austin.  Fireman 3rd Class, U.S. Naval Reserve.  He died at Great Lakes Naval base in Illinois on October 15, 1918 of influenza.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Melvin Davis. World War I.  Mich. PFC. 104 Field Artillery, 27th Div., WWI. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Marvin Davis.  World War I . Michigan, PFC 104 Fld Arty 27 Div, World War I. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Raymond A. Droller. World War I. Ohio Pvt., 16th Infantry. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Myles A. Frink.  World War I.  Myles served in the Polar Bear Regiment, 339th M.G. Company, on the Russian Front.   He is buried in Azalia Cemetery. (He is the son of Simon Frink.)

Harold K. Goetz. World War I.  Naval Aviation Machinists Mate.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Leslie Darius Masten. World War I.  Illinois. Pvt. Base Hospital, World War I.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Windsor D. Paine. 2D Lieutenant, World War I.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

World War II

Merlin F. Bachman.  World War II.  Mich. T. Sgt., 1371 Signal Co., Wing, WWII.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

William S. Marshall. World War II. S SGT SVC 36, Armd Regt.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Harold L. Masten. World War II.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Richard C. Pickens.  Mich. Pvt. 243 Port Co. TC WWII.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Olen Alfred Tucker. World War II.  MOMM 2 US NR. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

John D. Wittkop.  He served in the U.S. Army in World War II and was awarded the   Bronze Star. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Korea

Daniel Eyler, Jr. Korea.  Michigan PFC, Infantry, 1st Cavalry Division.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Edwin Keith Fouts. Korea. Corporal, U.S. Army.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

Fred R. Walker.  Korea.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

West Milan Becomes Cone

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Cone Elevator, Cone Road, Cone, Michigan.  Photo by Dwight Burdette.

Cone is located south of Milan on Cone Road, west of US 23, a community that is much smaller than its original settlement. In the early 1830s, Erastus S. Cone bought farmland in the southwest part of Milan Township in an area soon known as West Milan. He had six children, including John C. Cone, who later became postmaster of West Milan.  Erastus and his wife were divorced and then Erastus married again and had 11 more children by his second wife.  John C. Cone became the first postmaster of West Milan on August 4, 1869.

As the years rolled on the Cone name became prominent in the area because so many people acquired it by birth or marriage. In 1880, the Wabash Railroad opened a station in West Milan, calling it Cone, in honor of post master John C. Cone and in 1882, the United States government changed the name to the post office to Cone instead of West Milan.[18]

Businesses in West Milan -1879

WEST MILAN. Is a village situated in the township of Milan, 20 miles northwest of Monroe City, in the northwest corner of Monroe county, and southwest of Detroit 47 miles.  Dundee, a station on the C. S. R’y, 9 miles south, is its railroad point. Among its interests are two saw mills, stave and Leading mill, shingle mill, Methodist and Catholic churches. Farm produce and the products of the above mills form considerable shipments. Stage to Dundee weekly, carrying mail. John C. Cone, postmaster. [19]

Business Directory, 1879

Daniel T. Cone , cheese mnfr.

Horace  Cone, vinegar and cider mnfr. He and other family members are buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

John C. Cone Store and Saw Mill. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

William Cone . painter.

James C. Dennison cooper. He is possibly buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Reverend  Pierce-Methodist Episcopal

William C, Reeves & Co, saw mill. He is buried in Azalia Cemetery, Azalia, Michigan.[20]

John B. Zeluff , wagonmaker. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan

Cone Business Directory, 1887-1888[21]

CONE. Formerly known as West Milan, is located on the Indianapolis div. of W., St. L. & P. Ry, in Milan township, Monroe county, 21 miles northwest of Mon roe, the seat of justice, and 41 southwest of Detroit. Settled in 1880. Has a Methodist church. Population, 150. Exp., Pacific. Tel., W. U. Mail, daily. Wm. Curry, postmaster.

J.M. Auton, charcoal mnfr. (John M. Auten, Find a Grave, Martha Churchill)

James Calkins, painter. He is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Monroe.

Joseph Cone, Grocer and Railroad Agt.. – He is buried in Marble Park Cemetery, Milan, Michigan

Cone & McPherson, brick and tile mnfrs.

Jacob  Dennison, general store and asst postmaster. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

J.C. Dennison, cooper. – He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone

Peter M. Getty, justice of peace. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

George Gould, well digger.

Lewis Gould, carpenter.

G.W. Gurned, charcoal mnfr.

Hayden & Cone, saw mill and stave mnfrs.

William Landt, stave cutter – He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

John McDonald, watchman.

Nelson Rice, justice of peace.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

P.P. Vanerman, blacksmith

Some Cone Pioneers

Samuel Church Austin- Civil War Soldier and Traveling Preacher

Samuel Church Austin was born in Nunda, New York on September 4, 1838.

In 1861, Samuel married Polly Bowen and they had five children. She died in 1877, leaving him with four children to raise. He married Julia Rankin who died of the grip a few years later. After that, he married Hester Burr.

He was a Civil War veteran serving in Company B, First Michigan Infantry, who suffered for many years from chronic diseases that he had contracted in the Army.

Converted at the age of 28, Samuel accepted a call to preach at the Protestant Methodist Church, and afterward joined the Free Methodist Church.  Reverend Austin and his wife Hester traveled the United States and Canada for 17 years, evangelizing. He preached on town and city streets, in rough- hewn north woods lumber camps, and among the freed slaves of the South.  He often remarked, “I have got a wife who will go with me anywhere.  She is not afraid.”

His last words before he died in Milan, Michigan on March 7, 1907 were, “ We know through the prayer of Faith.”  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan and his wife Hester is buried in Cherry Valley Cemetery in Cannon Falls, Minnesota.

Merchant and Justice of the Peace – Erastus Samuel Cone, Sr.

Erastus Samuel Cone, Sr.  1798-1869. Born in Westminster, Vermont on March 34, 1798, Erastus Samuel Cone, Sr. was the son of John Cone and Rebecca Sage Cone. Erastus was a merchant and owned a grist mill in Claridon, New York. He married Nancy Thomas in July 1820 and they moved to what became the village of Cone, Michigan.  They had six children together and apparently later divorced.

On January 12, 1848, Erastus married his second wife Sarah Uptegraph and they eventually had eleven children.  In 1866, he served as justice of the peace.  He died on April 14, 1869, and he is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Stave Manufacturer,  John C. Cone

John C. Cone was born in Holley, New York on February 19, 1827 to Erastus Cone Sr. and Nancy Thomas Cone who moved their family from Vermont to Milan Township.  John settled in Cone where he manufactured staves, heading, and brick tile.  He married five times and had four children.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery in Cone, Michigan.

Farmer- Josephus Rice

In the fall of  1833, Caleb Rice left his wife Betsy and children in Orleans, New York and traveled to Michigan searching for farmland.  On October 11, 1833, he purchased three sections of land of 80 acres each in Milan Township at $100 per section and then he went back to New York and gave the land to his son Josephus.

Josephus was born in Orleans on October 22, 1815, and he moved to Michigan to farm the land his father Caleb had given him. He farmed his land and portion of it became the Rice Cemetery.

Josephus married Mary Goss and they had six children. He and Mary are buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Village Assessor and Village Councilman , Nelson Rice

Nelson Oliver Rice was the son of Josephus Rice and Mary Goss Rice who was born in 1846 on the farm where the Rice Cemetery is located. He married Ellen Gauntlett and they had two children. After her death, he married Fanny McMllen and that had one child. Nelson served as assessor of Cone Village for five years and he served on the village council for many years.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Some Veterans Resting in Rice Cemetery

ricecemetery

War of 1812

David Harry.  1791-1885, War of 1812. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Virgil Holcomb. 1787-1855. War of 1812.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Gilbert Allen Munson. War of 1812. Buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

George Taylor. War of 1812. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Civil War

Samuel Church Austin. Civil War. Company B,  First Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Jehiel Auten. Civil War. Enlisted February 1864 in Company G of the 23rd Michigan Infantry. He mustered out on June 28, 1865 at Salisbury, North Carolina.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone Michigan.

Thomas Jefferson Auten. Civil War. Company F, 26th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Edwin Bailey. Civil War. Company D, 20th Michigan Infantry at Ann Arbor on September 9, 1864. He mustered out on May 30, 1865 at Delaney House, Washington, DC.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Alonzo B. Cadwell. Civil War. Co. I, 1st Michigan Cavalry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Benjamin Caswell. Civil War.  Company B.  First Michigan Sharpshooters.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Thomas Caswell. Civil War.  Company F, 15th Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Martin Dennison. Civil War.. Company K, 9th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Benjamin W. Ellis.  Civil War.  Co. D., First Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Eusebia (Buck) Ellis. 1846-1902. The daughter of Solomon Buck and Rebecca Darling Buck, she married Willet Ellis.  She was a member of the Women’s Relief Corps,  the official women’s auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, recognized in 1883.

Eusebia married Willet Ellis who served as a Corporal in the 86th New York Infantry, Company A. Eusebia and Willet are buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Norman Minor Engle. Civil War. Company H, Michigan 1st Sharp Shooter Regiment. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Ira Gray. Civil War. Company F, 6th Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery in Cone.

Ansel Green.  Civil War. Sixth Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery in Cone, Michigan.

Lyman Greenfield. Civil War. Company F, 49th Ohio Infantry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Socrates Hoag. Civil War. First Regiment, Michigan Sharpshooters.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

John E. Hobbs. Civil War. M. Sgt. Company C, 5th Michigan Cavalry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Julius Holcomb. Civil War.  Company D, 20th Michigan Infantry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Justin Holcomb. Civil War.  Co. E., First Michigan Sharpshooters.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery in Cone, Michigan.

John Sears Jipson. Civil War. Company K, 1st Michigan Cavalry. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Monroe Lunger.Civil War. Company I, 120th New York Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan..

.L.M. McBride. Civil War. Company K, 20th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Daniel Robert McFall. Civil War. Sergeant, Company E, 17th Michigan Infantry. On May 12, 1864, he captured Colonel Theodore G, Barker, commanding officer of the Confederate Brigade that charged the Union position at Spotsylvania, Virginia. On the same day, he rescued Lieutenant George W. Harman of his regiment from the enemy. For bravery and courage in the face of the enemy, he was awarded the Medal of Honor on July 27, 1896.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Sidney B. Montonye. Civil War. Company G, Fourth Michigan Infantry. Reenlisted in Company G, Furst Michigan Infantry, and later transferred to Company C, Reorganized Fourth Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Clarence D. Phillips.  Civil War. Hall’s Independent Battalion, Michigan Sharpshooters, Company B.  He served and died at City Point, Virginia, at age 22. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Wade Richardson. Civil War. Company K, 26th New York Cavalry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Andrew Shaler. Civil War. Company B, 18th Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Jed Smith. Civil War.  Company K, 15 Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Smith L. Squires. Civil War. Company B, Hall’s Independent Battalion Michigan Sharpshooters. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

William Harrison “Harry” Wilcox.  Civil War. Company F, Fourth Michigan Infantry.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Spanish American War

Francis W. Draper. Spanish American War. Company L. 32nd Regiment, Michigan Volunteers. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

World War I

Morstean E. Caswell. World War I.  Horseshoer.  330th BN,  85th Division.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Thurlow Caswell.  World War I.  Michigan, PVT HQ, CO 399 Infantry, World War I. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Glenn Elmer Hill. World War I. Sixth Company. Recruit Tank Corps, USA.  Died at Camp Polk, North Carolina on November 27, 1918. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Arthur Utley. Ohio. Sgt. US Army, World War I.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

World War II

Ivan Leroy Bame. World War II. Corporal, U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Ervin A. Billau. World War II.  Tec 4 U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Henry W. Billau. World War II.  CPL U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Bert J. Bradner.  World War II. PFC U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Walter Jacob Curry.  World War II.  U.S. Navy, World  War II. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Howard L. Freeman. Sgt., U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Edward F. Godzina. U.S. Coast Guard, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Wilton J. Mangus. S1 U.S. Navy. World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Merrit F. Meaker, Jr. World War II.  U.S. Navy Veteran.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

James D. Pattie. PFC U.S. Army, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Edward J. Smetka. World War II. Died in World War II, August 10, 1944.  Michigan. PFC 793 Field Artillery BN. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Donald G. Staulter. World War II. United States Navy, World War II.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Robert E. White. Pvt. U.S. Army, World War II. He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Korea

Richard W. Hoag. CPL U.S. Marine Corps, Korea.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone.

Norman R. Jackson. U.S. Army, World War II and U.S. Air Force, Korea.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

James Studnicka.  U.S. Army, Korea.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

Myrl A. Wilsey. PFC U.S. Army, Korea.  He is buried in Rice Cemetery, Cone, Michigan.

 

Bikers Participate in the Annual Cone-Azalia Classic Bike Race.

 bicyclerace1bicyclerace2

 Notes

[1] http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=micounty;cc=micounty;sid=abb867ef6b9e2c2bab12d72b2a6a662b;q1=azalia;rgn=full%20text;idno=BAD1008.0001.001;view=image;seq=00000737  History of Monroe County, Michigan. Talcott Enoch Wing

[2] Biography of Sayre Reeves.   

[3] Talcott Wing. The History of Monroe County, Michigan. p. 593.

[4]      This long web page is taken from a series of articles which was published in The Double ‘A’ in the Fall of 1997 and Winter of 1998 and combined into one story.  This will give a construction era view of the building of the railroad along with the change through reorganization into the Ann Arbor Railroad Company as it was known, up until about 1906 in time-frame. BACKWARD IN TIME Building – THE ANN ARBOR RAILROAD. By Graydon Meints

[5] Toledo, Ann Arbor and Grand Trunk Railway

[6] Walter Romig, Michigan Place Names, p. 38.

[7] Michigan State Gazetteer, East Milan, 1875

[8] T. J. Ball was married to Amanda Rice Ball who is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[9]   Alonzo C. Hitchcock. 1837-1914.  Alonzo fought for three years in the Civil War.  On July 20, 1878 he began working on the  Ann Arbor Railroad and stayed on the job until ill health forced him to quit in 1911.  He is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[10]  Moses is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[11] Louis and Mary Knittle are buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[12] George Leet is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[13] Barber Theodore Leet is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[14] Joseph W. Meadows is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[15] William C. Reeves is buried in Azalia Cemetery.  He is a Civil War Veteran.  Company H, 18th Michigan Infantry.

[16] Daniel Springer is buried in Azalia Cemetery.

[17] The 1880 U.S. Census shows James and his wife Mary iving in Milan with their children Thomas and Mary.  He is buried in Esmond Evergreen Cemetery in Hale, Michigan.

[18] Walter Romig, Michigan Place Names, p. 129. History of Monroe County Michigan. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/pageviewer-idx?c=micounty;cc=micounty;sid=abb867ef6b9e2c2bab12d72b2a6a662b;q1=azalia;rgn=full%20text;idno=BAD1008.0001.001;view=image;seq=00000737

[19] Michigan State Gazetteer, 1879

[20] Beers Monroe Atlas.

[21] Michigan Gazetteer 1887-1888

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